Radford

Arthur H. Radford started Radford Electronics in 1946 and initially produced amplifiers for PA systems.  Buoyed by the feedback from numerous happy customers, Arthur realised that his fledgeling PA amp delivered a performance that could almost be considered hifi, so with further development he set out to conquer the hifi market.

The first hi-fi product was power amplifiers which demonstrated low levels of distortion – so lmuch so that the company had to devise new test instrumentation  to quantify the distortion level.  This led to an interesting spin-off where Radford lab gear was later to become just as famous as its audio products especially as  the Nuffield Schools Science Programme recommended the use of the Radford ‘Lab Packs for scholl science clas use.


The MK11 and Series 3 Amplifiers implemented a pentode phase inverter at the suggestionof Dr A R Bailey and was detailed in an article in Wireless World.

During te 1960’s the Radford STA25 stereo power amp, although looking like a piece of lab equipment and priced higher than it's contemporaries from Quad and Leak, displayed a performance better than them and became a firm favourite with discerning audiophiles.

Radford ceased trading in 1989 but the lineage continued under the Woodside brand name for several years thereafter.